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Wang appears at Nationals camp

Wang appears at Nationals camp

VIERA , Fla. -- Nationals right-hander Chien-Ming Wang arrived at Space Coast Stadium on Monday morning.

It was his first appearance at the stadium since the team held a news conference on Feb. 19 to announce that he signed a one-year, $2 million contract, which includes incentives that could push it up to $3 million.

In between, Wang was working out in Arizona before he arrived in Florida on Sunday evening. Wang was seen doing the same thing on Monday, playing catch with right-hander Jordan Zimmermann from 120 feet on flat ground.

Wang then pitched in the windup on flat ground before he watched his new team perform fielding drills. Wang then went inside Space Coast Stadium to work on his upper body before doing some stretching exercises.

"I feel better," Wang said. "I still [need to] rehab. Getting more stronger and then throw a bullpen [session]."

The Nationals believe acquiring Wang, 29, was worth the risk, even though he won't be ready by Opening Day. He's still recovering from arthroscopic surgery on his right shoulder. There is no timetable as to when he will pitch on a mound. Washington is hoping that Wang will be able to pitch in a big league game by May.

"The reports on Wang are real good. His rehab is on schedule," manager Jim Riggleman said. "We are pretty far down the road as far as having him pitch in games. What remains to be seen is when we get him on the mound and playing with the catcher. That will be determined by how he feels in the next few times after he does some long tossing."

Over the past two seasons, Wang has pitched 27 games (24 starts). In 2008, he didn't pitch after the All-Star break because of foot problems, and this past season, he missed the Yankees' World Series run because of his shoulder.

Wang has shown that, at his best, he can be the ace of a pitching staff. In 2006 and '07, he went a combined 38-13 with a 3.67 ERA for the Yankees. Wang is known for his tremendous sinker.

Bill Ladson is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

{"content":["spring_training" ] }
{"content":["spring_training" ] }